Fair OOTD | All About the Makers

Outfit 5...

As an advocate of the Slow Fashion movement, I've always stressed the importance of the makers. Within the fashion industry, artisans and ethically driven businesses need our support to continue this necessary movement against Fast Fashion. Without them, us conscious consumers will be purchasing our Gap shirts full of holes and chemicals at the Goodwill whose CEO makes an embarrassing amount of money for being a non-profit {this is just one example}. Not a lot of options without the sustainable makers, right?! These makers are changing the industry, and creating a more responsible way of experiencing fashion. Let's stand together & back this up! Click below for all the outfit's deets...

ModerNation's Upcycled Crop Top is a perfect representation of sustainable fashion. Not only are we supporting a small unique business, we are encouraging the use of already-made textiles. Instead of the previous garment sitting in a landfill and emitting harmful toxins into the air, this fabric has a happy home & a use all over again. 

Sometimes, a garment can tell a story about one's culture like this Huipil Skirt from Siempre Viva. For Huipils, their weavings are specific to their village, making each weaving very unique. Artisan-made is a category within sustainable fashion which started my journey to a more conscious wardrobe. I fell in love with the idea of Fair Trade & supporting indigenous craft over 5 years ago. 

Then there are the makers who are a one-run-show, like Katie from a girl named katie. She makes all her products in a little home studio, and creates sweet little clutches and accessories, like the fold over clutch pictured. Stay tuned for her release of the Gently Loved Collection! 

We always have those odds and ends at home where we have no idea where you can purchase them, but love their story just as much. My necklace I'm wearing was a gift from my grandparent's trip to Cuzco, Peru. It represents the Flower of Life - a geometrical figure composed of multiple evenly-spaced, overlapping circles arranged to form a flower-like pattern with a sixfold hexagon-type symmetry. You can find this pattern at the Sacsayhuaman Fortress. Plateria Leo is a silverware and jewelry shop who creates these beautiful necklaces representing this symbol out of natural material found locally {like shells}. 

To bring it all together, my shoes are quite old and almost falling apart. I bought them before my days of total conscious clothing purchasing, but feel getting rid of items deemed 'unethical' seems wasteful. I'll use them until they can't be worn anymore. 

What are some of your favorite pieces with a story or ones who support ethically-minded makers?